The Fifth-Generation War on White People

The Fifth-Generation War on White People by Marcus Apostate for UNZ Review

First They Came for White Southern Males…
Many Americans woke up this week to the crystal-clear realization that we have entered a fifth generation (5G) civil war for control of this county – a culture war, yes, but much more than that. In this short essay, I draw from history to briefly reflect on what this means to me as a more or less normal White guy who is trying to find ways to do more to resist the organized deluge of anti-White propaganda and policies.

Historical Parallels

Perhaps because I have been studying the rise of communism in Europe during the early 1900s, the past week feels eerily similar to my understanding of what it might have felt like to be a German Austrian in the 1910s and 20s, with the obvious difference that we have not recently lost a world war after failing in our attempts to salvage a dying, multicultural empire that has become increasingly hostile to its traditional citizens in order to secure the loyalty of its minority citizens. I believe I have uncovered nuggets of understanding, nonetheless.

I was not present in Austria a century ago, and I cannot really know what my Austrian doppelganger self would have felt thought while experiencing this period. I read a fair amount of history, but even this does not ensure this sort of experiential knowledge, since we self-censor our own diaries and journals. This matters little, however, because with some historical distance, I might see the situation more clearly than I would have if I lived during the time. And if the media and education system were as biased at that time against German-Austrian interests as they are against White American interests in the US today, then it is very likely that my understanding of Austria in the 1920s is better informed than those living them.

Rereading Mein Kampf, for the second time ever and the first time in over 15 years (and the first time I neither understood it nor finished half of it), it seems to me that Hitler felt much the same way that I do now. He was trying to save the Germans in Germany and Austria. I found it strange to admit to my wife that I think the biggest personality difference between Hitler and me is that he seems to have been rather more empathetic than I am. While I have completely lost patience with White Americans who intentionally or ignorantly are willing their own demise, Hitler repeatedly made excuses for those in Austria who were doing the same. He was so soft. But I think I have come to understand that he was trying to organize and inspire a mass of people far less intelligent and knowledgeable than himself, and so he needed to be patient with them. So, I believe that reading Mein Kampf again has made me a nicer, more understanding guy. I would contrast this with the way the Trotsky secured the loyalty of the officers of the Red Army, but that would be too much of a digression.

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For decades I have spent a couple of hours every morning carefully reading The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal, and several other major newspapers. But although such a detailed study of the American mainstream media is a necessary condition for remaining informed about our world, it is not sufficient. With the rise of the Internet and the alternative media, every thinking individual has increasingly recognized that there exist enormous lacunae in what our media tells us and disturbing patterns in what is regularly ignored or concealed. In April 2013 I published “Our American Pravda,” a major article highlighting some of the most disturbing omissions of our national media in issues of the greatest national importance. The considerable attention it attracted from The Atlantic, Forbes, and a New York Times economics columnist demonstrated that the mainstream journalists themselves were often all too aware of these problems, but perhaps found them too difficult to address within the confining structure of large media organizations. This reinforced my belief in the reality of the serious condition I had diagnosed.