Deadly flu pandemic could shut down Melbourne (Published 10/2014)

Deadly flu pandemic could shut down Melbourne (Published 10/2014) By Aisha Dow for AMP.The Age

TDC Note – Six years ago – yes, six years – this article detailed what is happening – almost to the letter – in Melbourne, Australia today. If you still believe the plandemic is real, well, good luck with that idea. #END

A deadly pandemic could shut down Melbourne as we know it.

Public transport could be terminated, AFL games cancelled and the casino, schools and office towers forced to close.

Illustration: Ron Tandberg
Illustration: Ron Tandberg

It has been predicted that the first wave of a pandemic could cause 10,000 deaths in Victoria. But families and friends may not be able to publicly mourn lost loved ones, because funeral services could be stopped as part of policy of “social distancing”.

While Ebola is currently the focus of public fear – with a doctor in New York testing positive for Ebola on Friday – an influenza pandemic is considered far more likely to cause mass deaths and panic in Melbourne.

It is a scenario that has been seriously considered and prepared for by all levels of government.

Melbourne City Council has its own detailed Influenza Pandemic Action Plan. Obtained by The Age using freedom-of-information laws, the document details the likely location of six “Mass Vaccination Centres”.

Outbreaks of influenza – often spread through coughing and sneezing – occur yearly during colder months in Australia. Pandemics can begin when a highly infectious new strain emerges for which humans have little or no immunity.

Australian National University Professor of Infectious Diseases, Peter Collignon, said there was a concern Australia could again see an influenza pandemic similar to the 1918 Spanish flu, which claimed about 10,000 Australian lives and caused more deaths worldwide than the First World War.

He said that every year there was a less than 1 per cent chance of experiencing a similar event. “However things can change, so we need to be vigilant,” he said.

Melbourne City Council’s pandemic plan was developed in 2008 in response to the H5N1 avian flu and considers a range of impacts of a deadly flu on Melbourne.

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