THE CRIMES OF TEDROS ADHANOM

THE CRIMES OF TEDROS ADHANOM from The Burning Platform

The head of the WHO was the 3rd most powerful person in the TPLF, a Communist Revolutionary Party in Ethiopia that was listed as a terrorist organization in the 90s and, as a political arm of a minority ethnic group (6%), reportedly conducted systematic discrimination and human rights abuses against the majority ethnic group. So odd that the MSM would neglect to mention this. I thought they hated racial discrimination, ethnic persecution and human rights abuses?

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Guest post by John Martin via Rough Estimate.

Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus, as well as being the first WHO director without a medical degree, also has a somewhat political background compared to his predecessors. On his online biography, the WHO lays out his qualifications as Ethiopian Minister of Health from 2002 to 2012, impressive stuff.

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Aside from his medical credentials, Tedros happens to be a member of the Tigray People’s Liberation Front (TPLF) which is an organisation about as peaceful as its name suggests. Founded as a communist revolutionary party that came to power in 1991, it led a guerrilla campaign against the Mengistu dictatorship and formed a coalition with two other ethnic parties after his exile.

Over time, the TPLF began to exert more and more influence over the other two parties. Most military generals and key leaders within the government are Tigray, including the Prime Minister who ruled the country for 21 years before his death. The Tigray represent only 6% of the population of Ethiopia, one of the major ethnic groups are the Amhara who mostly made up the Mengistu regime.

Favourable treatment under Megistu created a lot of resentment towards the Amhara from other ethnic groups like for example the Oromo. Tedros himself hails from the Tigray region and was a senior member of the party and became involved with the TPLF after the removal of Mengistu. The same party that in its 1968 manifesto called the Amhrara people its ‘eternal enemy’. Just how senior was Tedros? Well this Ethiopian newspaper listed him as the 3rd most important member of the politbureau standing committee, which gives the impression he was more important than a simple medical administrator.

The TPLF was listed as a terrorist organisation by the US government in the 1990s, and is still listed as one by the Global Terror Database because of its unfortunate habit of carrying out armed assaults in rural areas.

The Amhara people have reported systematic discrimination and human rights abuses by the current government. Humans Rights Watch in 2010 wrote a report on how aid in the form of food and fertiliser was withheld from local Amhara villagers because of their affiliations with the opposition party. Other forms of aid denial involved the refusal of emergency healthcare by ministry of health workers; the same ministry which was at the time being led by one Tedros Adhanom.

The Amhara People’s Union, an activist group based in Washington, has issued many other accusations of human rights abuses against the TPLF led government, including noting that the birth rates in the Amhara region was far lower than those experienced in other regions. They noted at a session in Ethiopian parliament that, around 2 million Amhara were found to have “disappeared” from the population census.

Not content with denying aid to political dissidents, Tedros was also health minister at a time when the regime was accused of covering up epidemics.  A cholera outbreak spread the region in 2007, infecting thousands in neighbouring countries. When it spread to Ethiopia, the government simply renamed the outbreak and called it Acute Watery Diarrhoea (AWD). International organisations were pressured not to call it Cholera (despite the UN testing the infected and finding Cholera), and were pressured by government employees not to reveal the number of infected. Another stunning victory for the health minister.

The deadly famine which struck Ethiopia in the 1980s forever associated the country with the word, but it’s not entirely a thing of the past. The WHO itself after pages of gushing reports on how well Ethiopia’s health sector was doing, admitted in 2016 that at least 8.6 million people still needed food aid to survive, and that the situation had not improved at all for at least four years. So at the end of Tedros’ illustrious term in office he could boast a mere remaining 8% of the population who would be left to starve to death without foreign aid.

But after his shining accomplishments in health, Tedros had bigger fish to fry. In 2012 he was appointed foreign minister and there quickly followed a crackdown on journalists and government opponents in the country, and an attempt to extradite those who had fled to Yemen in exile. The two countries entered negotiations to track down and deport dissidents from Yemen and imprison them in Ethiopia. Tedros himself led these negotiations, there’s even a nice picture of the medical man during the talks with the Yemeni foreign minister.

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One such case was a British citizen Andy Tsege who was arrested at Sana’a airport and twice given a death sentence in Ethiopia. This led to the involvement of the British government who threatened denial of aid to Ethiopia unless he be granted asylum. Tedros responded that Tsege was “being treated very well. He even has a laptop, have you ever heard of a political prisoner with a laptop?” Andy of course, after his return to the UK told a somewhat different story of being tortured for days on end, alongside dozens of other prisoners.

One of the reasons perhaps that Tedros’ qualifications as foreign minister is absent from some of his online CVs, may be because of the mass protests that engulfed the country in 2016. The Ethiopian government a few years earlier had unveiled a plan to seize 1000 square miles of land to be requisitioned for investment. This also involved the forced relocation of 15000 people in the Oromia region, which the government said was good because where they lived they currently “lacked infrastructure”

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Hardcore and hard hitting economic analysis. The Burning Platform presents information and analysis you will not find anywhere else. Various authors from a variety of backgrounds. Jim's work is featured regularly on Zerohedge.