Survival Trees – 5 Great Ones That Can Heal, Feed And Keep You Alive In A Crisis

Survival Trees – 5 Great Ones That Can Heal, Feed And Keep You Alive In A Crisis by: Pat B for Off the Grid News

Survival Trees 

When we think of trees in survival situations, we tend to gravitate to the obvious. Trees give us wood for our campfires. They provide structure for shelters, materials from which shelters can be built. These are all accurate perceptions, but survival trees, if you recognize and utilize them correctly, can contribute much more to our chances of survival than just firewood and construction materials.

Consider for a moment the varieties of nut trees that grow on the North American continent. There are hickories, walnuts, buckeyes, pecans, and hazelnuts to name just a few. Then consider the wild fruit trees, from plums to persimmons crab apples to mulberries. I hope it will become clear that at certain seasons, many trees can literally become “survival trees” and provide a wide variety of edible opportunities.

1. Oak Tree

Even the oak tree produces acorns which can be turned into meal or flour; the trick is to leach out all the tannins using a lot of fresh water. After gathering acorns, they must be dried so that the kernels can be removed from the husks. Once this is done, the kernels are ground into meal. After grinding, the meal is repeatedly soaked and drained for up to 6 days. The tannins must be removed from the meal before use, or they can cause stomach problems, kidney problems or inhibition of nutrient uptake. Once properly prepared, however, acorn meal makes fine bread, pancakes, and other baked goods.

Obviously, it is a very good idea to become accustomed to the trees in your area from a food gathering standpoint. But the utility of trees does not stop at fire, shelter, fruits and nuts. If you take a bit more time to learn about your local trees, they can provide other foods, medicines and become survival trees.

2. Willow Tree

One of my favorites is the willow tree. Willow bark is known to be an analgesic, an anti-inflammatory, and a fever reducer. It has been used since ancient time to relieve a headache, lower back pain, Osteoarthritis, fever, Flu, tendonitis, and Bursitis. In the 1800s one of the active compounds in willow bark, salicin, was used to develop aspirin. It has been suggested that willow bark has more pain relieving benefits at lower dosages, and with less chance of side effects, than aspirin.

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‘Off The Grid News’ is an independent, weekly email newsletter and website that is crammed full of practical information on living and surviving off the grid. Advice you’ll never hear from the mainstream media.