China’s Western garbage ban redux. You can’t make this stuff up (Video)

China’s Western garbage ban redux. You can’t make this stuff up Video – Jeff J Brown – China Rising

I have a reciprocal trade suggestion to make. Let China export to Eurangloland all the opium it can grow for the next 110 years, with zero import duties and payable only in gold and silver, just like Westerners did to China, 1839-1949. Then we can check back in 2128 and see how they are faring socially and economically. I’m sure they will be at the “top of their game”. Fair is fair. What’s good for the goose is good for the gander. The Chinese will be so rich that they can just ship the West all their garbage for FREE!

Picture above: the Chinese want to put people to work building environmentally friendly infrastructure, not sorting dangerous and dirty Western garbage. This cute, panda bear themed solar panel project is in Datong, Shanxi Province. My wife and I have traveled there several times, starting in the early 1990s, because there are so many mind-blowing, natural, historical and cultural sites to see nearby. I’ll never forget Datong in the 90s, with blackened skies and coal-fired everything belching putrid dust across the city. Go back now and China’s a changed world. Problem is, the West hasn’t changed its colonial, racist attitude towards one-fifth of the human race.

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Jeff Brown

Jeff grew up in the heartland of the United States, Oklahoma, much of it on a family farm, and graduated from Oklahoma State University. He went to Brazil while in graduate school at Purdue University, to seek his fortune, which whet his appetite for traveling the globe. This helped inspire him to be a Peace Corps Volunteer in Tunisia in 1980 and he lived and worked in Africa, the Middle East, China and Europe for the next 21 years. All the while, he mastered Portuguese, Arabic, French and Mandarin, while traveling to over 85 countries. He then returned to America for nine years, whereupon he moved back to China in 2010. He lives in China with his wife, where he teaches passionately in an international school. Jeff is a dual national French-American.