How to Use Potassium Iodide After a Nuclear Emergency

How to Use Potassium Iodide After a Nuclear Emergency by Daisy Luther – The Organic Prepper

Given the current concerns, you may be adding some emergency supplies that you are unfamiliar with to your pantry and medicine cabinet. This article explains how to use potassium iodide after a nuclear strike and addresses some frequently asked questions.

At the end, there’s a link to a downloadable format of this article that you can print out to keep with your emergency supplies.  I’m not a doctor – this article is based on research done on official government websites. Sources are also cited at the end.

(The abbreviation for potassium iodide is KI, which I’ll use for the rest of the article.)

Why you need potassium iodide after a nuclear emergency

Aside from the immediate threats of a nuclear blast, the thyroid gland is the most susceptible organ to damage from radiation. Potassium iodide is a stable form of iodine (stable meaning it isn’t radioactive.) If the thyroid gland is loaded with stable iodine, it can’t absorb radioactive iodine. Radioactive iodine can cause cancer. Here’s how the CDC explains it:

The thyroid gland cannot tell the difference between stable and radioactive iodine. It will absorb both.

KI (potassium iodide) blocks radioactive iodine from entering the thyroid. When a person takes KI, the stable iodine in the medicine gets absorbed by the thyroid. Because KI contains so much stable iodine, the thyroid gland becomes “full” and cannot absorb any more iodine—either stable or radioactive—for the next 24 hours.

This doesn’t protect your body from any other type of radioactive isotopes – only radioactive iodine. It won’t undo the damage done by radioactive iodine, so you must begin taking it immediately for protection. If there is no radioactive threat, you should not take KI, as it can be harmful.

How do you take potassium iodide after a nuclear strike or other radiation emergency?

The sooner you begin taking KI after an emergency, the better. It works best if taken within 3-4 hours of an emergency.Here are the dosages recommended by the FDA.

Here are the dosages recommended by the FDA.

  • Newborns from birth to 1 month of age should be given 16 mg (¼ of a 65 mg tablet or ¼ mL of solution). This dose is for both nursing and non-nursing newborn infants.
  • Infants and children between 1 month and 3 years of age should take 32 mg (½ of a 65 mg tablet OR ½ mL of solution). This dose is for both nursing and non-nursing infants and children.
  • Children between 3 and 18 years of age should take 65 mg (one 65 mg tablet OR 1 mL of solution).
  • Children who are adult size (greater than or equal to 150 pounds) should take the full adult dose, regardless of their age.
  • Adults should take 130 mg (one 130 mg tablet OR two 65 mg tablets OR two mL of solution).
  • Women who are breastfeeding should take the adult dose of 130 mg.

Here’s a chart provided by the FDA.

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Please feel free to share any information from this site in part or in full, leaving all links intact, giving credit to the author and including a link to this website and the following bio. Daisy Luther is a single mom who lives in a small village in the mountains of Northern California, where she homeschools her youngest daughter and raises veggies, chickens, and a motley assortment of dogs and cats. She is a best-selling author who has written several books, including The Organic Canner, The Pantry Primer: A Prepper's Guide to Whole Food on a Half-Price Budget, and The Prepper's Water Survival Guide: Harvest, Treat, and Store Your Most Vital Resource. Daisy is a prolific blogger who has been widely republished throughout alternative media. On her website, The Organic Prepper, Daisy uses her background in alternative journalism to provide a unique perspective on health, self-reliance, personal liberty, and preparedness. You can follow her on Facebook, Pinterest, and Twitter