These Were Supposed To Be Hillary’s Numbers!

These Were Supposed To Be Hillary’s Numbers!

Good headlines just keep coming. The Chicago PMI index of Midwest economic activity jumps to its highest level in two years. The ADP employment report shows 216,000 new jobs added in November. US Q2 GDP growth is upgraded to a completely acceptable rate of 3.2%.

Very nice numbers all. And – had the election gone a different way – a big help in easing the transition from one Democrat administration to another. Success breeding success.

But a different number explains this apparently-accelerating expansion: US federal debt, which after growing by only $330 billion in 2015 soared by $1.38 trillion this year. For more on why this happened, see Another Election Year, Another Bunch Of Fake Growth Numbers. But for now it’s enough to say that $1.3 trillion is a lot for the entire US economy to borrow in a single year. For the federal government alone to do so is huge.


Now let’s consider some other numbers that will emphatically not make things easier in the year ahead.

US interest rates are soaring. After rising gently from a June low of 1.4% to about 1.8% in early November, the yield on US 10-year Treasury bonds has since spiked to nearly 2.4%.


Higher interest rates are, in effect, a tax increase on borrowers – which is to say on pretty much everyone these days. By ratcheting up the interest cost of any debt that has to be rolled over or is linked to a reference rate like LIBOR or Prime, they siphon off capital that might otherwise be used for investing or consumption, thus slowing growth, lowering government tax revenues and generally making everything harder. One interesting stat: If the Japanese government had to pay an average of just 2% on its debt – that is, less than the US Treasury now pays – its interest costs would exceed its tax revenues. Sayonara Tokyo.

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John Rubino is managed by John Rubino, co-author, with GoldMoney’s James Turk, of The Money Bubble (DollarCollapse Press, 2014) and The Collapse of the Dollar and How to Profit From It (Doubleday, 2007), and author of Clean Money: Picking Winners in the Green-Tech Boom (Wiley, 2008), How to Profit from the Coming Real Estate Bust (Rodale, 2003) and Main Street, Not Wall Street (Morrow, 1998). After earning a Finance MBA from New York University, he spent the 1980s on Wall Street, as a Eurodollar trader, equity analyst and junk bond analyst. During the 1990s he was a featured columnist with and a frequent contributor to Individual Investor, Online Investor, and Consumers Digest, among many other publications. He currently writes for CFA Magazine.