Welcome to Neocolonialism, Exploited Peasants!

The U.S. peasantry has been stripmined exactly like the powerless colonial peasantry in the old colonial model.

In my latest interview with Max Keiser, Max asked a question of fundamental importance: (I paraphrase, as the interview has not yet been posted): now that the current iteration of capitalism has occupied every corner of the globe, where can it expand to for its “growth”?

My answer: neocolonialism, my term for the financialized quasi-colonial exploitation of the home domestic population. I described this dynamic in The E.U., Neofeudalism and the Neocolonial-Financialization Model (May 24, 2012).

We all know how old-fashioned colonialism worked: the imperial power takes political and economic control of previously independent lands.

In the traditional colonial model, there are two primary benefits:
1. The imperial power (the core) extracts valuable commodities and low-cost labor from its colony (the periphery)
2. The imperial power sells its own high-margin manufactured goods to the captured-market of its colony.

This buy low, sell high dynamic is the heart of colonialism, which can be understood as one example of the The Core-Periphery Model (June 11, 2013).

The book Sweetness and Power: The Place of Sugar in Modern History is an excellent history of how this model worked for Great Britain.

The Imperial Core controls finance and credit via its multinational banking sector, and it maintains high profit margins via its state-cartel model of production. The state enforces a cartel-crony-capitalist pricing structure in which competition is strictly limited to street stalls and black markets, and the corporatocracy can raise prices at will: for example, pharmaceutical products such as Epi-Pens can be repriced at will from $60 to $600 each.

If the colonists resist, the resisters are silenced and the media brought under control of the Imperial Deep State. (Sound familar? It should.)

This traditional model of colonialism was forcibly dismantled in the 1940s-1960s. Former colonies established their political independence, a process that diminished the wealth and global reach of former colonial powers.

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