What Ambassador Told State Dept. Just Before Benghazi Attack

by Jack Davis, Western Journalism Ambassador Christopher Stevens and three other Americans were killed in the Sept. 11, 2012 attack on the U.S. compound in Benghazi, Libya. America’s ambassador to Libya was pleading for extra security personnel two months before his 2012 death at the hands of terrorists, according to a newly released cable. The Hillary Clinton-run State Department turned him down flat. Ambassador Christopher Stevens and three other Americans were killed in the Sept. 11, 2012 attack on the U.S. compound in Benghazi, Libya. The House Select Committee on Benghazi was formed to investigate the attack. “Overall security conditions continue to be unpredictable, with large numbers of armed groups and individuals not under control of the central government, and frequent clashes in Tripoli and other major population centers,” Stevens wrote. He said 13 security personnel would be the “minimum” needed for “transportation security and incident response capability.” Patrick Kennedy, a deputy under then-Secretary of State Hillary Clinton, rejected the request, Fox News reported a congressional source as saying. Stevens’ cable followed by weeks an attempt to assassinate the British ambassador to Libya. Also during June 2012, an IED blasted a hole in the outer wall of the U.S. consulate. In all, 234 security incidents took place in Libya in the year before the Benghazi attack, including 50 that took place in Benghazi itself. On the day he was killed, Stevens sent a cable to Clinton stressing the gravity of the situation, the Washington Times reported Monday. Stevens told Clinton that militia leaders were angry at the United States, and that “they would not continue to guarantee security in Benghazi, a critical function they asserted they were currently providing.” Stevens’ Sept. 11, 2012 cable discussed a “state of maximum alert” just ending in Benghazi, mentioned “extra-judicial killings” of Libyan government officials, reported on a fatal car bombing, and cited the destruction of power lines.

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