Russia’s Armata T-14 Tank Sends Shivers Down Washington’s Spine

from Sputnik News Washington has plenty to fear from Russia’s new Armata T-14 tank, a Russian-American scholar noted, adding that states seeking to constrain the US’ freedom of action will jump at the opportunity to purchase sophisticated Russian weaponry. Russian designers have demonstrated that they can develop the next generation of weapons system, Professor Nikolas K. Gvosdev, a Russian-American security expert, noted, adding that the United States has good reason to fear Russia’s new Armata battle-tank.

“For post-Soviet Russia, it makes sense to revitalize defense industries,” the professor pointed out, emphasizing that “part of the strategy for reindustrializing Russia, therefore, is to rejuvenate the defense industry and take advantage of growing demand–in a more unipolar, G-zero world–for sophistical armament systems.”

According to Gvosdev, the march of the new Russian T-14 Armata through Red Square on the Victory Day will attract the attention of “several intended audiences.” While for domestic viewers the message will be that Russia has regained its position as a producer of sophisticated weapons, the show will also signal to a variety of Moscow’s potential clients that Russia’s defense industry is up and running and able to produce advanced military systems which can compete on par with Western arms. The world’s emerging powers view Moscow with its network of design bureaus, factories, industrial plants and testing grounds as an alternative supplier of arms. And they will undoubtedly jump at a chance to bolster their defense capabilities. So far, if Russia finds enough buyers for its weaponry it will gain the opportunity to both pay for its domestic military buildup and to develop more sophisticated arms, the professor emphasized. At the same time there are a number of countries seeking ways to constrain America’s “freedom of action” in the world, the expert remarked. They are well aware that since the end of the Cold War Washington “continues to look for low-cost, no-casualty options when it contemplates intervention,” and prefers to avoid “a high degree of sacrifice.” Equipped with advanced weaponry systems these countries will be able to resist a US advance or “make the costs of operating prohibitively high in terms of possible casualties or losses of equipment” for the United States, the expert underscored. “Having more states around the world in possession of equipment, particularly systems that Washington does not want sold, as a way to create difficulties for the United States is seen as worth the longer-term danger,” Nikolas K. Gvosdev stressed.

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