A Fantasy That Explains Globalism

by Jon Rappaport, The Daily Sheeple

Imagine this fantasy. In Indiana, all citizens are under the gun. They must work in factories where the wage is 20 cents an hour. There are no unions. When unions start to form, the leaders are arrested or killed. Employers and the state government provide unsanitary crowded dormitories for worker housing. No citizen of Indiana can leave the state legally without a special passport.

In Delaware, citizens can come and go. Through collective bargaining and other measures, the average wage for a factory worker is $27 an hour. The worker lives in his own home.

There is a shoe-manufacturing company in Indiana, and also in Delaware.

The Delaware state government suddenly passes a law saying that importers can buy shoes from the company in Indiana and bring them into Delaware for sale. There will be no import tariffs of any kind.

The citizens of Delaware protest. They point out that this law will kill the shoe company in Delaware. Their state government tells them; the law is the law.

And this whole Indiana-Delaware arrangement is mislabeled free-market capitalism or free trade.

It’s a market, but it isn’t free. The workers carrying the load in Indiana are under the gun. Nowhere in their state can they earn more than a few cents an hour.

This isn’t capitalism. It’s Globalism.

Capitalism doesn’t work when the two partners live in areas where the working conditions are vastly different.

It never did.

This is the reason treaties like GATT and NAFTA and CAFTA and the upcoming TPP have been launched: mega-corporations want to roam free. They want to be able to inject money into any entity in the world and suddenly remove it at will. They certainly want to be able to ship goods from one nation to another without paying tariffs, which otherwise would cost them an extraordinary amount of money. For these corporations, nations don’t really exist anymore—they are convenient fictions. These corporations don’t want any restrictions on their plundering of the Global Village.

On the mega-corporate front, this plan for world control remains the Rockefeller template. “Free trade.” The plan was advanced, ceaselessly, for 40 years until, on January 1, 1995, the World Trade Organization was fully formed and took charge of the criminal rules of global commerce: the crowning moment.

However, back in the early 1970s, the whole operation had been “infected.” One man, a crook, a President, a liar, an insecure parody of a head of state, Richard Nixon, went off script. He REALLY went off script.

In an effort to bolster US companies and protect them from foreign competition, Nixon (on Aug 15, 1971) began erecting tariffs on a range of goods imported into the US (and took American money off the gold standard).

If this Nixon economic plan spread to other countries, the entire Globalist program to install “free trade” and mega-corporate emperors on their thrones for a thousand years could crash and burn.

Nixon was a David Rockefeller man. He was owned by them. He’d been rescued from financial ruin by The Family, and now he was in the White House undermining their greatest dream. You can’t overstate the degree of the betrayal, from the Rockefeller point of view. You simply can’t.

Something had to be done. The president had to go. This was a true motivation behind Watergate. Yes, there were sub-motives and smaller contexts, as in any major op, but a prime mover was: get Free Trade back on track, and get suitable revenge on the puppet in the White House who went off-script.

The man behind the curtain was David Rockefeller.

After the whole Watergate scandal had been exposed and Nixon had flown away, in disgrace, from the White House for the last time, Rockefeller addressed a meeting of the Chamber of Commerce of the European Community (October, 1975).

He was there to allay their fears about Nixon’s betrayal of the new economic world order. There was really very little he needed to say. David had already created (1973) the Globalist Trilateral Commission. And a new puppet, Gerald Ford was in the White House, and Ford had appointed David’s brother, Nelson Rockefeller, as his vice president.

David told the European attendees, “Fortunately, there are no signs that these anti-[free] trade measures [of Nixon] are supported by the [Ford] Administration.”

And that was that. The global mega-corporate colossus was back on track.

The temporary rip in the Matrix had been repaired.

The innocuous-sounding “free trade” policy is the number-one priority of every American president. He must do two things: rarely speak of it, and allow it to move forward. That’s all. In return, he gets to act as if he’s the most powerful man in the world.

But if he wobbles and considers taking up a position against free trade (corporate domination of the planet), he can look back and see what happened to Richard Nixon. He can learn from that example.

He can recall the famous words of Zbiggie Brzezinski, co-founder of the Trilateral Commission and David Rockefeller’s intellectual flunkey:

“The nation state as a fundamental unit of man’s organized life has ceased to be the principal creative force: International banks and multinational corporations are acting and planning in terms that are far in advance of the political concepts of the nation-state.”

Yes, and that planning includes every possible advantage for mega-corporations in a borderless world.

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