The Money Myth Exploded

by Louis Even, Michael Journal The Money Myth Exploded” was one of the first articles of Louis Even, and remains one of the most popular to explain how money is created as a debt by private banks. It is available in the form of an 8-page leaflet (tabloid format) that you can order from the “Michael” office, in several languages: English, French, Spanish, Italian, German, Polish, Portuguese. Link 1. Shipwreck survivors oil An explosion had blown their ship apart. Each one grasped the first bit of wreckage that came to hand. And when it was over, there were five left, five huddled on a raft which the waves carried along at their will. As for the other victims of the disaster, there was no sign of them. Hour after long hour their eyes searched the horizon. Would some passing ship sight them? Would their make-shift raft finds its way to some friendly shore? Suddenly a cry rang out: “Land! Look! Over there, in the direction the waves are carrying us!” And as the vague silhouette proved itself to be, in fact, the outline of a shore, the figures on the raft danced with joy. They were five. There was Frank, the carpenter, big and energetic. It was he who had first cried, “Land!”. Then Paul, a farmer. You can see him, front and left in the picture, on his knees, one hand against the floor, the other gripping the mast of the raft. Next is Jim, an animal breeder; he’s the one in the striped pants, kneeling and gazing in the direction of land. Then there is Harry, an agriculturist, a little on the stout side, seated on a trunk salvaged from the wreck. And finally Tom, a prospector and a mineralogist; he is the merry fellow standing in the rear of the picture with his hand on the carpenter’s shoulder. 2. A providential island oil To our five men, setting foot on land was like returning to life from the grave. When they had dried and warmed themselves their first impulse was to explore this little island on to which they had been cast, far from civilization. A quick survey was sufficient to raise their spirit. The island was not a barren rock. True enough, they were the only men on it at the moment. But judging from the herds of semi-domesticated animals they encountered, there must have been men here at some time before them. Jim, the animal breeder, was sure he could completely domesticate them and put them to good service. Paul found the island’s soil, for the most part, to be quite suitable for cultivation. oil Harry discovered some fruit trees which, if properly tended, would give good harvests. Most important were the large stands of timber embracing many types of wood. Frank, without too much difficulty, would be able to build houses for the little community. As for Tom, the prospector, well, the rock formations of the island showed signs of rich mineral deposits. Lacking the tools, Tom still felt his ingenuity and initiative could produce metals from the ores. So each could serve the common good with his special talent. All agreed to call the place Salvation Island. All gave thanks to Providence for the reasonably happy ending to what could have been stark tragedy. 3. True wealth oil Here are the men at work. The carpenter builds houses and makes furniture. At first they find their food where they can. But soon the fields are tilled and seeded, and the farmer has his crops. As season followed season this island, this heritage of the five men, Salvation Island, became richer and richer. Its wealth was not that of gold or of paper bank notes, but one of true value; a wealth of food and clothing and shelter, of all the things to meet human needs. Each man worked at his own trade. Whatever surpluses he might have of his own produce, he exchanged for the surplus products of the others. Life wasn’t always as smooth and complete as they could have wished it to be. They lacked many of the things to which they had been accustomed in civilization. But their lot could have been a great deal worse. Besides, all had experienced the depression in Canada. They still remembered the empty bellies side by side with stores crammed with food. At least, on Salvation Island, they weren’t forced to see the things they needed rot before their eyes. Taxes were unknown here. Nor did they go in constant fear of seizure by the bailiff. They worked hard but at least they could enjoy the fruits of their toil. So they developed the island, thanking God and hoping for the day of reunion with their families, still in possession of life and health, those two greatest of blessings. Continue Reading>>>

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