Russia Is Tightening the Noose for a Military Invasion of the U.S.

by Dave Hodges, The Common Sense Show

Do you remember as a child in elementary school playing games like “Capture the flag” and “King of the hill”? As you grew older you were taught from a military perspective that military commanders want to occupy the high ground.  If we go on to learn military strategy, we frequently encounter the admonitions that it is imperative to occupy the high ground. The master analyst of all warfare, Sun Tzu often spoke of this as well:

 

If enemy camp is on high ground, do not climb to launch attack.

The Ongoing Buildup At the North Pole

Under the UN Convention on the Law of the Sea, which was finalized in 1982, countries can lay claim to the ocean floor well beyond their borders so long as they can provide convincing scientific evidence to prove that a particular seabed is an extension of their continental shelf. Already, countries have sovereign rights to resources within 200 nautical miles of their territorial waterways. For a country to determine whether they have economic sovereignty beyond that distance, the UN agreement requires comprehensive mapping that establishes some sort of geologic justification for the claim. And where the Arctic is concerned, Canada, the US, Norway, Russia, and Denmark have been amassing scientific evidence for more than a decade in an effort to increase their piece of this resource-rich pie. From a resource perspective, the wars have been fought for less significant reasons than what we are seeing transpire at the North Pole. However, the major reason to fight over the control of the North Pole is the same reason as we fought for the high ground in our children’s games, namely, military domination over our opponent.

The Military Significance of Occupying the North Pole

Take one more look at the Arctic map at the top of the page. If Russia can complete its task of establishing military dominance over the North Pole, it will be free to attack in any direction against high value targets. These hypothetical military advances coming out of the North Pole will force both NATO and the United States to shift into a defensive posture in order to prepare for a northern invasion coming out of the North Pole.

On any given morning, the Russians could attack into the territories of the Scandinavian countries, thus threatening Europe. The nations of Eastern Europe (e.g. Hungary, Poland), are already living under fear of invasion from the East. Now, they would potentially be caught in a vice from the North. This would make NATO’s defense of Eastern Europe virtually indefensible.

Simultaneously, Russia could sweep down from the North Pole and attack through Northern Canada. And of course, Alaska is fully exposed. In a World War III scenario, Alaska would be a high variety target, unto itself, because of the McKinder Hypothesis which states that historic Russian military strategy is predicated on securing valuable sea ports, because the long Russian shoreline does not have any valuable sea ports to speak of.

In one fell swoop, Russia could launch the military equivalent of the TET offensive attacks (1968) in which the Viet Cong attacked every provincial capital on the same day during the TET cease fire arranged for a Vietnamese holiday. The Viet Cong could not sustain such a widespread front and the attack collapsed but not before American morale and citizen support for the war had eroded. However, the Russians do have the military depth to sustain such a military action.

When I look at a map of the North Pole, I see a chessboard. Not when, but if the Russians fully occupy the North Pole, their mere presence at the top of the world will result in a checkmate kind of move. The troops, supplies and equipment needed to prepare for an invasion from the North, would be troops, supplies and equipment not assigned to engage Ukraine, Syria, Iran, Taiwan and South Korea due to Russian and/or Chinese invasion.

 

Do the Facts On the Ground Support the Military Hypothesis?

russian map north pole finlandJust since the beginning of 2015, Russia has begun to position its forces in key strategic positions. For example, in mid-January of 2015, the Russians began to move military assets to the Arctic region of the Finish border as they reopened an abandoned military base on the Kola Peninsula in the Russia city of Alakurtti recently, just 60 kilometers from the Finnish border. Checkmate Europe!

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