Gold Sovereigns Bought by Greeks in Volume as New Greek Drachmas Designed

by Mark O’Byrne, Gold Core feature image/thedollarvigilante.com – Greece warns may default on IMF loan next week – Greek bank runs continue and deposits flee – German Bundestag votes for bailout extension – Syriza agree to a bailout extension of four months, in return for concessions yet to be approved by the EU – Questions over Syriza negotiating a weak deal despite it’s strong position – Greece and EU buying time to arrange orderly “Grexit”? – Greece has printing presses poised to print newly designed Greek Drachmas – Greeks buying gold bullion The Euro Working Group discussed Greece’s imminent funding problems yesterday amid mounting concern about how the country will meet its massive obligations. Minister of State for Coordinating Government Operations Alekos Flambouraris suggested yesterday that Greece might delay payment to the IMF if it cannot find the necessary money. Greece is due to pay the IMF 1.6 billion euros next month but the Greek Minister said that Athens might ask to delay this payment for two months. Proposed New Greek Drachmas Kathimerini reports that “the possibility of Greece postponing the repayment of any debt tranches to the IMF is seen as “exceptionally complicated” with “many obstacles,” according to officials “familiar with the subject”. They stress that such a move would constitute a “clear default,” with consequences for a large number of other loans Greece has received.” Yesterday the Bank of Greece presented its latest, January, bank deposit data and it shows bank runs continue in Greece. There was a record €12.2 billion monthly outflow of deposits. This is, greater in absolute and relative terms than anything experienced during any of the previous Greek crises and bailouts. The total amount of Greek corporate and household deposits has now tumbled to just €148 billion. This number is in line with some of the more pessimistic expectations, and brings the total cash holdings at Greek banks to the lowest level since August 2005. Separately and not surprisingly, the German parliament has approved the bailout extension by a large majority in the Bundestag. The announcement last Friday that Greece would, after all, adhere to an extended bailout program was viewed as a capitulation by Syriza and a triumph for Germany and the Eurogroup. The statement, which simply reaffirmed the existing program, substituting some unpalatable terms with euphemisms – Troika is referred to as “institutions,” for example, has sparked dissent within Syriza itself and the first violent protests against the new government outside the Greek parliament were seen yesterday. We consider it odd that Greece should have folded while it’s hand was so strong. Greece could push the EU to the brink. From the point of view of Syriza’s electorate, things cannot get much worse anyway. Ultimately, Greece could get it’s bridging loan from Russia or the BRICS bank so why should Syriza buckle and face national humiliation when it did not need to. We suspect a larger game is afoot. Sharelynx.com Some analysts have suggested that the EU and Greece have reached a stalemate and are preparing to attempt an orderly exit by Greece from the Euro and back to the Drachma. This may certainly be the case. Greece has newly designed Drachma notes (see above) and printing presses waiting for the order to start rolling. Where all this is leading is anyone’s guess. If it is a simple case of Syriza being out-smarted by it’s EU partners it can only lead to social unrest in Greece and a possible rise of the fascist Golden Dawn. At any rate, Greece is bankrupt with no hope in sight, at least within the Euro monetary union, so eventual default appears inevitable. If Greece and the EU have agreed to disagree there is no guarantee that the process will be orderly despite the best intentions of both sides. If it is achieved it will open the door for other peripheral nations to follow suit, each exit process a mine-field. Greeks have been accumulating physical gold in recent months in anticipation of bank holidays, possible bail-ins and indeed a possible return to the drachma. Despite the last minute Greek debt deal, we are continuing to see demand from Greece including demand from companies and some high net worth buying. Demand in January and so far in February has been very high with dozens of new accounts opened and purchases valued in the millions. Many of the new Greek clients said that these were not one of purchases, as is often the case, rather initial purchases, with a view to buying more in the coming months. Continue Reading>>>

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