China’s Global Gold Supply “Game of Stones”

by C Serpa, Grams Gold China has a 4-way global gold supply domination strategy. And it’s starting to corner the market. 

First, China buys physical gold in world markets, fabricates it where necessary into “good delivery” bars – in Switzerland or the Middle East – then ships the bullion, transparently through Hong Kong or Shanghai (or quietly through Beijing and other ports of entry).

Second, it keeps virtually all domestically mined gold “in house.” Third, China partners with or buys high grade, in-situ gold (and silver) projects around the globe. 


“The dollar is headed toward the sacrificial altar, with a knife made of gold. Sooner or later, the central bankers will have to throw in the towel, and just let gold run.”

One of the most well-known recent actions… 
…has involved negotiations to partner with Barrick Gold on its massive cost-overrun-plagued Pascua Lama project, which straddles the Chilean-Argentine border. 

Most recently, China’s largest gold producer, Zinjin Mining Group, made a strategic investment in Pretium Resources’ high-grade Brucejack gold Project in northwestern British Columbia to the tune of $80 million. This latter investment will facilitate eventual construction of a 2,700 tonne-per-day underground mine. 

Fourth, and virtually impossible to quantify with a reasonable level of accuracy, are China’s efforts to purchase “off the books” gold production from what are known as informa or artisanal gold miners in Africa and South America. This gold, which will never show up on an import manifest, nevertheless adds one more acquisition stream to the literal river of bullion flowing directly into the coffers of China’s golden hoard. 

U.S. intelligence advisor Jim Rickards, author of The Death of Money, recounts an episode told to him by a friend who is a senior officer of a high-security transporter of physical metals who had brought gold into China at the head of an armored column, guarded by heavily-armed troops.

One of these days, at a time of its choosing, China may reveal just how much gold it does hold, alongside a possible decision to enable a newly gold-backed currency, the Yuan, to make its debut on the world’s financial stage. 

Such an event would have profound implications for the primacy of the U.S. dollar, as well as America’s ability to continue running printing press deficits, long financed by Chinese purchases of U.S. debt instruments, to the tune of several trillion dollars. 

China’s Undisclosed Gold Reserves: 

“A dagger pointed at the heart of the dollar”  

When this event takes place, it will become evident to the world’s financial players that, as Rickards so poignantly remarks, China’s true gold reserves will have become “a dagger pointed at the heart of the dollar.”

Most Westerners fail to appreciate the methodology by which China has traditionally pursued – and often successfully achieved – its geopolitical ends.

China’s strategies are oriented from the perspective of many years or even decades, unlike Western governments, who often judge success or failure based upon quarterly or annual progress reports. 

They are not likely to be concerned if the Pascua Lama project is not in production 10 years from now. They know that the gold – and silver is in the ground, so it’s just a question of when – not if – they can acquire a substantial amount, adding it to their continually-growing stash.

Some Westerners are familiar with a Japanese board game of strategy called “Go.” Few know that this game actually originated in China more than 2,500 years ago. Though the two player game has fairly simple rules, the number of possible games is several times that of chess. The objective is to outmaneuver the opponent, surrounding the largest area of the board with one’s own stones.

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