Syriza Stands Defiant, US tries to calm EU stance while Greenspan predicts Grexit

from Gold Core – Tsipras to push ahead with counter-reforms “in their entirety” – Dijsselbloem tells Syriza it must comply with Troika this week or have funding cut from February 28th – Varoufakis calls the Eurogroups bluff – does not believe EU would risk expelling Greece from Euro – US apply pressure on EU to keep Greece in the fold, fears “Grexit” would push Greece into Russia’s arms – Greeks buying gold as insurance against uncertainty Despite attempts last week by EU technocrats to browbeat the new and inexperienced Greek government into submission, Syriza appear to have grown even more resolute to fulfil their mandate. Alan Greenspan has thrown down the gauntlet and predicted a Greek exit from the Euro. Noting the contradiction at the heart of Europe Greenspan pointed out that without political unity you can not have a fiscal unity. “The problem is that there is no way that I can conceive of the euro of continuing, unless and until all of the members of the eurozone become politically integrated – actually even just fiscally integrated won’t do it.” Greenspan’s words may prove to be prophetic as European rhetoric has become increasingly polarized and the only leader with any real power, Merkel, seems to be captured by special interests within the financial services apparatus. The contagious effects of a Greek exit could be catastrophic for the EU as other debt laden countries eject centrist technocratic parties in favour of new nationalist parties, typically filled with nuevo politicians with very little experience. Watch for swift elections in Italy, Portugal, Spain and Ireland. Should Europe sneeze then the United States could catch the cold. An exit and its repercussions could make Lehman look like a picnic. Varoufakis and Dijsselbloem In a speech to the Greek parliament on Sunday night, Prime Minister Tsipras made what London’s Telegraph described as a “declaration of war” on the Eurogroup of finance ministers and the EU hierarchy. Mr. Tsipras stated that Syriza would proceed to raise the minimum wage, raise pension payments for the poorest and reverse the privatisation of state assets among other things. He also said he would pursue Germany for €11 billion in reparation payments for the plundering of Greece during the Nazi occupation from 1941 to 1944. Tsipras’s first official act in office – visiting the Kaisariani rife range where the Nazi’s executed 200 Greeks – reflects how any left-leaning greeks view the European project in it’s present guise. While finance minister Varoufakis has tried to downplay the significance of the visit, saying it was a message to new Golden Dawn and other fascist groups in Greece, the fact remains that many Greeks view the EU as a tool of a new wave of German imperialism. During the Nazi occupation somewhere between 250,000 and 300,000 Greeks starved to death as the country was plundered to feed the war machine. The cost of living rose, on average, 722% each month following the invasion. For over three years Greeks suffered immense deprivation. As such, the bitterness and resentment that had lain dormant resurfaced when austerity was foisted upon ordinary greeks, apparently at the behest of German banks. The emotional charge behind the Syriza movement should not be underestimated. Continue Reading>>>

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